Atypical Moles - Symptom, Causes & Treatment

The medical term for a mole is a NEVUS. Atypical moles are also referred to as Clark's nevi or dysplastic nevi which are made up of a particular type of cell, and the name is used to distinguish them from other, similar appearing fleshy growths. Moles vary in size from small dots to more than 1 inch in diameter. They may be flat or raised, smooth or rough (wartlike), and may have hairs growing from them.

Moles usually are easily recognized by their typical appearance. They do not itch or hurt, and they are not a form of cancer. Larger than normal moles (more than a half inch across), atypical moles are not always round.

Atypical moles can be tan to dark brown, on a pink background.Nevi (moles) can look like beauty marks (e.g., Cindy Crawford) or they can protrude like a bump on a witch's chin (common nevus).

Most people have between 10 and 40 moles. Darker skinned persons frequently have darker colored moles. People with atypical moles-particularly those with a family history of melanoma-must look for any changes that might indicate malignant melanoma.





Skin Disorders and Diseases

Androgenic Alopecia
Acanthosis Nigricans
Allergic Contact Dermatitis
Acne
Acne Vulgaris
Acne Treatment
Acrochordons
Actinic Keratosis
Angioma
Erythroderma
Facial Rashes
Folloculitis
Ringworm
White Spots
Aphthous Ulcers
Athlete's Foot
Atopic Dermatitis
Atypical Moles
Barnacles of Aging
Basal Cell Carcinoma
Bateman's Purpura

 

Cellulite
Cholinergic Urticaria
Chilblain
Contact Allergy
Cherry Angioma
Chondrodermatitis Helicis
Clark's Nevus
Dermatofibroma
Dandruff
Darkcircles Under Eyes
Eczema
Dry Skin
Mastocytosis
Pruritis Ani
Berloque Dermatitis
Boils
Blackheads
Bullous Pemphigoid
Hand Eczema
Perioral Dermatitis
Oily Skin
Candida



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